Forming a proper thesis statement

It should also be underscored that the deontic appearance of ordinary epistemic discourse seems to have a distinctively categorical flavor; that is, the phenomenology of our everyday talk and thought about duties, obligations, oughts, seems to imply the existence of categorical duties and obligations such as duties that are in some sense unconditional, that is independent of our psychology (desires, dispositions, beliefs,) and constrain what we ought to believe insofar as we are rational. For example, if a speaker utters, “You should believe that p” in an ordinary conversational context her statement would, typically, conversationally implicate that it is an (epistemic) fact of sorts that “You should believe that p.” A fortiori, the conversational implication is that anyone epistemically rational would be obliged to believe that p because it constitutes a categorical epistemic obligation (derivative of a corresponding epistemic fact).

This trend is fully confirmed in the check-list choices. In Table 2 we report the frequency (in terms of percentages) with which each term in the check list was selected. For the sake of brevity of presentation we state the results for the positive term in each pair; the reader may determine the percentage of choices for the other term in each pair by subtracting the given figure from 100. To illustrate, under Condition A of the present experiment, 91 per cent of the subjects chose the designation "generous"; the remaining 9 per cent selected the designation "ungenerous." Occasionally, a subject would not state a choice for a particular pair. Therefore, the number of cases on which the figures are based is not always identical; however, the fluctuations were minor, with the exception of the category "good-looking— unattractive," which a larger proportion of subjects failed to answer.

Jennifer H. Fernandez (St. Joseph College-Olongapo)
Riogel L. Santiago (St. Joseph College-Olongapo)
Raquel B. Cabardo (Don Bosco Technical Institute of Makati)
Greg Emmanuel D. Baniaga (The Nazarene Catholic School, Manila)
Adeva Jane H. Esparrago (Xavier University Junior High School-Ateneo De Cagayan)
Vanessa L. Vizcarra (Divine Word College of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro)
Connie B. Dagdagan (Divine Word College of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro)
Nino Anthony C. Banlaygas (Upper Villages Christian Academy, Laguna)
Carlo R. Dela Cruz (Lourdes School, Quezon City)
Arnold B. Edosma (Dr. Rosita B. Britanico Academy, Caloocan City)
Grace Liza R. Guaves (De La Salle Lipa)
Estrella H. Montealegre (Ateneo De Naga University)

An article review is both a summary and an evaluation of another writer's article. Teachers often assign article reviews to introduce students to the work of experts in the field. Experts also are often asked to review the work of other professionals. Understanding the main points and arguments of the article is essential for an accurate summation. Logical evaluation of the article's main theme, supporting arguments, and implications for further research is an important element of a review. Here are a few guidelines for writing an article review.

Forming a proper thesis statement

forming a proper thesis statement

An article review is both a summary and an evaluation of another writer's article. Teachers often assign article reviews to introduce students to the work of experts in the field. Experts also are often asked to review the work of other professionals. Understanding the main points and arguments of the article is essential for an accurate summation. Logical evaluation of the article's main theme, supporting arguments, and implications for further research is an important element of a review. Here are a few guidelines for writing an article review.

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